Tuesday, April 14, 2009

*Another Extension*


It looks like my unemployment is extended again!!!!!!!!!! Another 20 weeks after the four weeks I have left, so I should have another 6 months. I say should have because I always have to read EDD's announcements several times, and then I'm still not 100% sure until the notification comes in the mail. I'm posting the article here because I need to go through it a few more times, but it seems exactly as unclear and noncommital as last time when I got another 20 weeks. The only caveat is that I will have to keep better records of my job searching but NO PROBLEM. I will keep EXCELLENT RECORDS. I feel like all the of the cells in my body just relaxed; I didn't realize how tense I really was.



***

Federal-State Extended Duration Benefits (FED-ED)

On March 27, 2009, the Governor signed legislation that would allow unemployed workers in California to potentially receive up to another 20 weeks of unemployment insurance (UI) benefits. This is an additional extended benefit program known as the FED-ED extension.
The Department is currently working on the programming to file and process the FED-ED extensions. It is anticipated this programming will be completed by mid April. When the programming is completed, claimants who have already exhausted all of their regular UI and current federal extension benefits, and are retroactively entitled to a FED-ED extension, will be notified by mail that additional benefits are available. They will be able to file online.
Once programming is complete, those who are nearing the end of their current federal extension claims will automatically receive appropriate claim forms and notification regarding these benefits. They will not have to contact EDD to apply for or re-file for FED-ED benefits.
Federal and State law does not allow payments to be made on a FED-ED extension once you are qualified to file a new regular claim in any state, regardless of the benefit amount on the new regular claim. So if you’ve earned wages that qualify you for a new regular claim in any state, all payments on your FED-ED extension must stop. This means that, if you qualify for a new regular claim, you cannot continue to collect benefits on your FED-ED extension.

WHO IS ELIGIBLE FOR FED-ED
You may be potentially eligible for FED-ED benefits if you meet all of the following criteria:
Are fully or partially unemployed on or after February 22, 2009.
Have exhausted your entitlement to a regular UI claim (up to 26 weeks of benefits).
Have collected all benefits on your first federal extension (up to 20 weeks of benefits).
Have collected all benefits on your second federal extension for weeks ending on or after February 21, 2009 (Up to 13 weeks of benefits).
Are not qualified to file a new regular UI claim.
Meet all eligibility criteria.

HOW TO FILE
Once you have collected all benefits on your first and second federal extensions, you may be eligible to file for FED-ED benefits. If you are eligible to file a FED-ED extension, the Department will automatically file it and send you additional continued claim forms. No action is required on your part as long as you have been continuously collecting benefits.

BENEFIT AMOUNT OF A FED-ED CLAIM
If you are eligible for FED-ED:
Your weekly benefit amount will be the same as your regular UI claim;AND
Your maximum benefit amount will be 80 percent of the maximum benefit amount on your regular UI claim.

SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS
If you are eligible to file a FED-ED extension, you must follow additional eligibility requirements in order to receive your weekly payments. It is required that you:
Look for work every week.
Fill out Section B on the back of the Continued Claim form with your work search information for each week.
Accept any offer for work you are capable of performing if the weekly gross pay would be equal to or greater than the weekly benefit amount on your FED-ED extension. You may be disqualified for benefits if you do not accept the job. For example:
The weekly benefit amount on your FED-ED extension is $450. You are offered a job working 40 hours per week at $11.25 per hour. You must accept that job offer because your total earnings for one week would be equal to the weekly benefit amount on your FED-ED claim ($11.25 x 40 = $450).
The weekly benefit amount on your FED-ED claim is $320. You are offered a job working 20 hours per week at $8 per hour. You do not have to accept that job offer because your total earnings for one week would be less than the weekly benefit amount on your FED-ED claim ($8 x 20 = $160).

DISQUALIFICATIONS
Failure to look for work or accept suitable work will result in a disqualification for benefits. If you are disqualified from receiving FED-ED benefits because you did not look for work or you refused to accept work, the requirements to remove the disqualification are different than the requirements to remove a disqualification from a regular UI claim or other extension claims. If you are disqualified for either refusing work or failing to look for work, you will not be eligible to collect FED-ED benefits. To remove the disqualification you must return to work for a minimum of four weeks and earn four times the weekly benefit amount of your FED-ED extension.
A further requirement of FED-ED is that if you were disqualified for other UI benefits prior to filing a FED-ED claim, because you refused work, or you were fired or quit a job, you will not be eligible to collect FED-ED benefits unless you have worked a specific amount of time and/or earned a specific amount of wages since being disqualified.

FUNDING
FED-ED payments are entirely funded from the Federal General Fund for tax-rated and private non-profit reimbursable employers, which means that these employers will not be charged for any benefits paid to claimants on FED-ED extensions filed with an effective date on or before December 20, 2009.

2 comments:

  1. Ok, There are 2 regular extensions to unemployment and then after that there is a "Fed ed" extension, that makes 3 extensions after the first regulat unemployment starts thus equals 4 unemployment claims which includes the first "Fed ed" extension.

    Are there any benefits after that? Is there a additional "Fed ed" extension?

    ReplyDelete
  2. After the Fed-ed extention their is the your-dead disqualification. I'm currently holding out for a change in this law.

    ReplyDelete